Transfer of Title Deed in Thailand

Before you can transfer your Title Deed in Thailand, you need to understand what type it is. The official forms are Chanote or Nor Sor 4 Jor. There are also Tor Bor and Sor Kur Nung title deeds. Let’s discuss these in more detail. There is also a difference between the two. Chanote is the most secure type of title deed, but it can be difficult to find.

Nor Sor Si Jor (N.S. 4 J.)

There are two kinds of land freehold title deeds in Thailand: Nor Sor Sam and Nor Sor Si Jor. Both of these documents confirm that you own a piece of land. Nor Sor Sam is issued by the Land Department after a land survey is completed. The boundaries of the land parcel are defined using GPS. Nor Sor Sam does not require the publication of legal acts, although it is likely that you will be able to subdivide your land in the future.

Nor Sor 3 Kor Title Deed

Nor Sor 3 Kor is a type of title deed in Thailand. Unlike other Thai title deeds, the Nor Sor 3 document does not grant full ownership and use rights. Instead, it simply confirms that the owner has the right to use, sell, and register rights against the land. In some cases, this document can be upgraded to another type. It is important to seek legal advice from a property lawyer before purchasing this type of title deed.

Tor Bor Title

In Thailand, it is possible to upgrade a Tor Bor title dee. This deed is a common form of squatters or settlers’ claim to a piece of land. The title can be filed with the district office, but it is not registered for sale or lease. In fact, no banks will accept a Tor Bor title dee as collateral. It is a waste of money to purchase a land plot with a Tor Bor title dee.

Sor Kur Nung Title

A Sor Kor Nung, or SK.1, is a type of land title in Thailand. It gives the holder the right to inhabit, farm, and use the land. It may be transferred from one person to another, or passed by inheritance. In Thailand, Sor Kor Nung land titles are commonly transferred in succession and inheritance cases. It may also be transferred without a title, if there are a number of family members living on the property.

Nor Sor Saam Gor Title Deed

There are three types of land title deeds in Thailand: Nor Sor Saam Gor, Nor Sor Si Djor, and Nor Sor Sam Kor. The Nor Sor Saam Gor title deed is most commonly used by foreigners. This title deed gives you ownership rights to a plot of land that you are leasing, selling, or using as mortgage collateral. If you are a foreigner, it is important to note that you are not permitted to abandon your land for more than twelve years without any permission from the Land Department. If you change your mind about the use of the land, you must publish a public notice for 30 days.

Chanote Title Deed

A chanote is the strongest form of a title deed in Thailand. It is a certificate of title that approximates freehold rights in many Western countries. A chanote must be surveyed in detail and staked with concrete marker posts before it can be legally sold. Because of these requirements, fewer chanotes are issued in rural areas. However, this problem is slowly being addressed.

Land Area

A Nor Sor 3 Kor is a type of Thai land title. The Nor Sor 3 document confirms the legal title and ownership of a specific piece of land. These documents are not possessory in nature, but they do provide the owner with the legal right to own the property. These documents serve as legal documents and are also the basis for selling, registering and using rights to the land.

Cost of a Title Deed

Generally speaking, Thailand’s land titles are Chanote. Translated as “Title Deed”, they are legal documents registered with the Land Department. They clearly state who owns the land, how it was previously used, and the exact boundary lines. When purchasing a Chanote, the purchaser is registered as the legal owner of the property. The governing document, called the Nor Sor 3 Gor, is a semi-accurate measurement of the land. This document also checks for previous utilisation.

Chanote Land Title

In Thailand, you can acquire a Chanote land title transfer deed from the Department of Land. This is a government agency located in the same district as Chanote. The transfer process usually takes one to three hours. Before you start the process, make sure that you have the property’s legal description and size. You should also check to see if the title is a full Chanote. This will ensure that you have full ownership rights.

Transfer of Title Deed

Step 1: Pre-purchase agreement

Once you have agreed to buy or sell the condominiums, the first thing you should do is to sign the pre-purchase agreement with another party. The pre-purchase agreement is usually done at the same time with the deposit or the first payment.

Step 2: Buyer transfers fund from oversea

The fund must come from another country other than Thailand – the one who transfer money from oversea need to fill in Telegraphic Transfer Form (T/T Form) specifying the objective of transaction. Purchase funds must be transferred in foreign currency only and converted to Thai Baht by the beneficiary Thai Bank.

Step 3: Buyer obtains the documents from Thai bank

After the fund is transferred to Thai bank, you need to obtain from the bank the Foreign Exchange Transaction form (FET). This document is required by the Department of Land of Thailand to be presented as evidence of oversea fund transfer.

Step 4: Seller obtains the foreign quota certificate and debt-free certificate

Seller will request the juristic office of the property to issue foreign quota certificate and debt-free certificate for all common expenses prior to ownership transfer date. Usually this process can take up to 15 days so the owner should request the documents in advance.

Step 5: Ownership transfer at Department of Land

After all the documents are ready, both parties can schedule the transfer date at the Department of Land office. Upon receiving the Land Deed, the buyer will exchange the cheques or cash with the seller. The seller will also handover the key sets, access card and all other necessary items to the buyer.

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